EuroTribe

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Category: Travel Tips

Zagreb’s Museum of Broken Relationships

“The Museum of Broken Relationships encourages discussion and reflection not only on the fragility of human relationships but also on the political, social, and cultural circumstances surrounding the stories being…

The Museum of Broken Relationships encourages discussion and reflection not only on the fragility of human relationships but also on the political, social, and cultural circumstances surrounding the stories being told. The museum respects the audience’s capacity for understanding wider historical, social issues inherent to different cultures and identities and provides a catharsis for donors on a more personal level” the EMF’s (European Museum Forum) judging panel noted this when awarding it as Europe’s most innovative museum in 2011.

It all started as a traveling exhibition based on the idea of failed love relationships. Anyone can donate an object which represents their broken relationship along with a story and objects could be anything from a fluffy toy and music CD to something more extreme as an axe. You can also become a donor and send your exhibit. Donors come from all over the world, from neighboring Serbia to far Japan.

Stories are usually packed with humor, hatred and hurt. The exhibition was shown in cities like Amsterdam, Paris, Istanbul, Singapore, Belgrade, Berlin and Ljubljana.

Winter coat and love notes - Museum of Broken Relationships Zagreb

I was determined to marry her. After two months I called her. She told me that she was in love with another guy who lived near her home. No words came from my mouth, tears ran like a new river from my eyes, and I hung up. I never called her again. My heart was broken very badly, I cried a lot. I spent many sleepless nights. Still her memories are chasing me, still I am crying. She left me alone. Months passed. I moved to my national capital of Delhi. Still it hurts” says an Indian guy Prasanth who donated love notes and winter coat.

“Love is a violent recreational sport. Proceed at your own risk. Helmets, armor, and steel-toe boots are required by law.”

H.C. Paye

Tarantula Bob Dylan - Museum of Broken Relationships

You move on and the next exhibit says “Given to me by an American “boyfriend” when I was 17 and inscribed “for _____ who charmed the savage wolf”. I didn’t know that he would hound my parents for years and would eventually have a sex change and steal their name for his new persona.”

Goalkeeper gloves - Museum of Broken Relationships

Museum of Broken Relationships Zagreb

A pharmaceutical bowl - Museum of Broken Relationships

Axe in the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb

And here’s an “Ex-Axe” story or to be more detailed a story of two lesbians and an axe being promoted to a therapy instrument. After being left for another woman by her partner, this woman from Berlin decided to chop her ex’s furniture. “Two weeks after she left, she came back for the furniture. It was neatly arranged into small heaps and fragments of wood. She took the trash and left my apartment for good.

“Love is an invited deal for losing peace.”
― Seema Gupta

An mp3 and a key ring - Museum of Broken Relationships

A postcard - Museum of Broken Relationships Zagreb

Olive seeds - Museum of Broken Relationships

A Linksys router - Museum of Broken Relationships

A Linksys router with a message “We tried. Not compatible.”

Not every museum will give you an emotional, thoughtful and funny experience like this one and that’s the reason I totally recommend it if you are in Zagreb.

And there’s something we shouldn’t forget;

“There is always love, hope and life after a broken heart.”
― Jelord Klinn Cabresos

The best example for this are Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić who founded this museum after their own relationship broke up!

Which object from your past relationship would you leave in the museum?

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A guide to Timisoara, Romania

So you are thinking of visiting Romania’s third most populous city? This guide to Timisoara should help you out. Timisoara can be easily reached from many locations like Budapest or…

So you are thinking of visiting Romania’s third most populous city? This guide to Timisoara should help you out. Timisoara can be easily reached from many locations like Budapest or Belgrade (click to read “Belgrade to Timisoara by train“). The name of the city comes from the river Timis that flows to the south of the city and this is the main center of the historical Banat region. It’s a small city and one day is more than enough for exploring it.

SIGHTSEEING

The best way to start sightseeing is by grabbing a map of the tourist attractions at some of the tourist information centers in the city.

Timisoara tourist map

As you can see the map suggests some routes that you can opt for. I suggest you opt for route 3 simply because you will see more attractions. Timisoara is known as the “City of parks” in Romania, so it has a special park route as well. You will most probably start your sightseeing from the Victory Square. From here you can easily visit the Orthodox Metropolitan Cathedral which is one of the symbol buildings of the city. It’s also one of the biggest churches in Romania.

the Orthodox Metropolitan Cathedral

Interior of the Orthodox Metropolitan Cathedral

Victory Square has many buildings in the “1900s style” with great architectural elegance. One of the most notable buildings in the square is the Culture palace which houses the Romanian Opera House. It was devastated by two fires and rebuilt again. The auditorium has 600 seats. Timisoara is actually the only European city that has state theatre in three languages as it also hosts the German State Theatre and the Hungarian State Theatre “Csiky Gergely”.

Culture palace Timisoara

Culture palace

By exploring the city you will notice that street art is an important part of a city’s culture. Timisoara also hosts annual “Graffiti and Street Art International Festival” in September with the aim to represent street art works on great and visible sufraces. For more photos click here.

Timisoara street art

Besides Victory square another important square is Unirii. You can see the Holy Trinity Monument here, in baroque style. The three sides show bas-relief with scenes from the plague epidemics which occurred from 1738-1739.

Unirii square Timisoara

Unirii square

One of the most beautiful buildings is the Baroque palace which dates back to the 18th century. Franz Liszt held a concert in the baroque room of the palace in 1846. The building had various names and functions: it used to be the President’s Palace (18th century), headquarters of the Timis Banat and Serbian Vojvodina Governor and since 1984 it has hosted the Art museum.

Serbian Orthodox Vicarage and Serbian Orthodox Church are another important landmarks of the city. The building of the Serbian Vicarage is under the administration of the Serbian community since 1865 and it hosts an old religious art collection.

Serbian church Timisoara

Interior of a Serbian church

Theresia Bastion which used to be a fortress during the 18th-19th centuries is another interesting landmark.

Theresia Bastion Timisoara

Theresia Bastion

Eat/Drink

The local cuisine is influenced by Hungarian, Serbian, German and Arabic specialties.

There is a great Lebanese restaurant in the Victory square called “Beirut”. Shawarma here is really tasty and cheap! You can spot Hungarian kürtőskalács everywhere and Serbian pljeskavica is also quite popular.

Also, you will find many street stalls selling sandwiches, kebab, french fries etc. with great prices.

I recommend a visit to Bierhaus to enjoy a nice beer. There are more than 50 types of beer available here, so you won’t have a problem picking the right one. If you want to try Romanian beer choose Silva or Timișoreana.

Accommodation

There are not many hostels in Timisoara. I’ve stayed in Downtown Hostel which is located in the Victory Square. The hostel is small but cozy as it has three dorms: one of eight beds with shared bathroom, one double-bed room with private bathroom and one twin room with shared bathroom.

It also has a social room and a chill out balcony. But the best part of this hostel are the staff. Great place to enjoy your stay and I absolutely recommend it.

downtown hostel timisoara

Downtown hostel

Downtown Hostel in Timisoara

The walls of the balcony

If you have visited Timisoara, feel free to leave your suggestions below.

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Belgrade to Timisoara by train with “Banat Special”

So you want to go from Belgrade to Timisoara or the opposite direction and are thinking of the best way to do it. At the moment there are no direct…

So you want to go from Belgrade to Timisoara or the opposite direction and are thinking of the best way to do it. At the moment there are no direct lines between two cities, which means that you will have to make a stop in a small town called Vršac.

The best way to do it is by train, which leaves two times a day from Belgrade and from Timisoara. The distance between two cities is about 160 km and the journey will last four hours.

Serbian Railways has a special offer called “Banat Special”, with round trip tickets costing 14 euros. This is great, considering that a round trip ticket by bus between Belgrade and Vršac costs 1365 RSD (11 euros).

*UPDATE* The international train line between Vršac to Timisoara and vice versa, is suspended from August 1st, 2017. 

 If you are going from Belgrade to Timisoara…

Trains to Vršac depart from BEOGRAD DUNAV station (Belgrade Danube station), NOT from the Central Railway station. As already mentioned, there are two daily departures so you have two options; 1) To catch the morning train which leaves at 07:19 and arrives to Vršac at 09:10. Then from Vršac you can catch a train to Timisoara which leaves at 10:18.

2) Or to catch the afternoon one which leaves at 16:20 and arrives to Vršac at 18:09. From 18:40 you can catch a train to Timisoara.

Belgrade Vrsac train

Serbian train operating between Belgrade and Vršac

Belgrade Vrsac train

Interior of a Serbian train

This is a modern train, the only downside is that it stops in almost every village, which makes the journey slower.

 When you arrive to Vršac, the train for Timisoara will be waiting for the passengers. This is a very small train stop and it’s not possible to buy any food or drinks at the station, although there is a kiosk right in front of the main entrance to the station.

Vrsac Timisoara train

Train to Timişoara

This train has less stops so it travels faster through Romanian teritory and its final stop is Timisoara NORD train station.

 If you are going from Timisoara to Belgrade;

You also have two options; 1) Catch the morning train which leaves Timisoara at 06:50 and arrives to Vršac at 08:52. Then catch the train for Belgrade which leaves Vršac at 09:44. 2) And afternoon option: Leaves Timisoara at 15:38 – arrives to Vršac at 17:45. Leaves Vršac at 18:45 – arrives to Belgrade at 20:37.

Vrsac Timisoara train

Romanian train to Timişoara

Romanian train is also quite modern and travels faster as there are no frequent stops, although the heating system didn’t work.

Vrsac Timisoara train

Interior of a Romanian train

Things to remember about Timisoara NORD station:

1) Toilets are locked (at least they were in early morning). Hopefully situation is different during the day.

2)  Don’t buy food at train station. It’s of bad quality and questionable health. So definitely grab something in the city before you arrive to the station.

And of course, always check the actual timetable and ask if there are any works on the railway. However, when buying a ticket you’ll surely be informed about that. You can check the timetable here. Just type (Beograd Dunav – Vršac; Vršac – Timisoara NORD).

 Safe travels!

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Spare time in Belgrade? Go to Avala mountain

Avala mountain is located 16 km from the capital city of Serbia, Belgrade, and it has a reputation of being a popular day or even weekend getaway from busy city…

Avala mountain is located 16 km from the capital city of Serbia, Belgrade, and it has a reputation of being a popular day or even weekend getaway from busy city life. Avala is inviting especially for its walks which allow people to relax in nature.

With a height of 511 meters, Avala fits within the ‘Mountain range’, no pun intended. In the middle ages it was famous for the Avala Town, which was later conquered by the Ottoman Turks. Today the areas surrounding Avala are not heavily populated, although the mountain’s location is very close to Belgrade’s city boundaries.

Avala mountain Belgrade

Avala is one of the protected green areas of Belgrade and it has more than 600 plant species living on the mountain. Many species are  protected by law due to their natural rarities, with 21 of the 67 bird species considered rare in Serbia.

Avala tower

Besides being famous as a traditional weekend and picnic resort, other attractions on the mountain include the newly built Avala Tower which is the tallest tower in Serbia and the Balkans region. Originally it was a telecommunication tower destroyed by the NATO bombing in 1999, with the new tower officially opened in 2010. The tower has a viewing platform on top with the beautiful view overlooking Belgrade, Vojvodina and Šumadija.

View from Avala tower

View from the tower!

One of the most famous monuments located on Avala is the “Monument to the Unknown Hero” which is a protected monument by the country.

Monument to the Unknown Hero

Monument to the Unknown Hero

For those who love sport activities besides walking, can indulge in activities including orienteering, climbing, mountain biking and running.

And if your hunger gets the best of you, on the top of the Mountain there’s a hotel with the restaurant “Avala”, dedicated to serving delicious meals.

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Is the Stockholm Card worth buying?

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and it’s also known as the capital of Scandinavia. Stockholm is considered quite an expensive city at times but it is always worth visiting!…

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and it’s also known as the capital of Scandinavia. Stockholm is considered quite an expensive city at times but it is always worth visiting! In this article I will review the Stockholm card and we’ll see if the Stockholm Card is worth buying.

So first of all; What is the Stockholm card exactly?

The Stockholm card is the official card issued by the Stockholm Tourist Board, which when purchased gives you access to 80 museums and attractions, public transport and many other bonus offers for the duration of the card.

The Stockholm Card’s price is based on its length of validity, which ranges from 1, 2, 3 or 5 days from the first time it is activated. The card is valid once per museum/attraction and it is valid for an unlimited amount of trips on SL transit vehicles for its duration of validity.

So let’s take a look at the prices.

Adult one day (450 SEK/51 EUR)
Adult two days (625 SEK/70 EUR)
Adult three days (750 SEK/85 EUR)
Adult five days (950 SEK/107 EUR

Now let’s check the prices of some museums and attractions;

Nobel Museum (Adults: 80 SEK)
Vasa Museum (Adults: 110 SEK)
The Royal Palace (Adults: 100 SEK)
SkyView (Adults: 130 SEK)
Fotografiska (Adults: 110 SEK)
Skansen Open-Air Museum (Adults: 70-120 SEK)
Moderna Museet (Adults: 100 SEK)

Let’s say you wish to visit all of these museums – that would cost you a total of 700 SEK, which is only a bit less than Stockholm card valid for a period of three days (750 SEK).

However, that is just the first part, let’s take a look at the cost of public transport now;

Tickets for one and two zones are valid for 75 minutes from the time of purchase and activation. Each ticket costs a total of 36 SEK, or 4 EUR for first zone and 54 SEK, or 6 EUR, for the second zone.

For a ticket with 24 hour validity, it costs a total of 115 SEK or 13 EUR, whilst a 72h ticket costs 230 SEK or 26EUR. For a 7 days ticket, the cost is 300 SEK or 34 EUR.

As you can see, public transportation is much more expensive than in other European capitals.

So if you wish to spend three days in Stockholm, plus you purchase a 72h ticket, the total price would cost you 230 SEK more due to the price of attractions costing 700 SEK plus the transport cost. In total, without the Stockholm Card, it would cost you 930 SEK or 105 EUR for 3 days. If you remember, the Stockholm three day card was only 750 SEK or 85 euros, so basically you would save at least 20 euros.

Of course it all depends on your travel tastes and what you love to do, but if you are really into culture and museums, plus you plan to stay 3 or more days in Stockholm, I think this card is very handy and helpful and also saves you the hassle of waiting in the queues and buying tickets. From my experience it was very helpful especially when it comes to using the public transport which is very expensive in Stockholm.

Also note that the prices included here were based on the price of an adult and that some museums are free of charge if you are under the age of 19, plus there are discounts for students, so the best would be to check the website of each museum you want to visit or the website of the Stockholm Tourist Board.

So Is the Stockholm Card worth buying?

Yes definitely, especially if you are staying for 3 or more days. If you are not such a culture freak and you prefer nature and exploring the city by bike, there are some other ways to save rather than using this card.

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